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Article
January 16, 1987

Lymphadenopathy Syndrome in Homosexual MenEvidence for Continuing Risk of Developing the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Viral Diseases (Drs Kaplan, Fishbein, and Schonberger and Mr Pinsky) and the Division of Host Factors (Dr Spira), Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta.

From the Division of Viral Diseases (Drs Kaplan, Fishbein, and Schonberger and Mr Pinsky) and the Division of Host Factors (Dr Spira), Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta.

JAMA. 1987;257(3):335-337. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390030065022
Abstract

Seventy-five homosexual men with lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS) for three months or more and antibody against the human immunodeficiency virus were enrolled in a prospective study in Atlanta in 1982 and 1983. Fourteen developed the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) three to 38 months after enrollment in the study and five to 56 months after onset of LAS. The five-year cumulative incidence rate of AIDS after onset of LAS was 29%; yearly incidence rates showed no decreasing trend with time. Of 18 patients with constitutional symptoms and a low T-helper cell count at their first visit, nine developed AIDS; of the remaining 57 patients, five developed AIDS (five-year cumulative incidence rates, 57% and 18%, respectively, P<.001). Patients with lymphadenopathy syndrome are at continuing risk for the development of AIDS. Those with constitutional symptoms and a low T-helper cell count at their first visit appear to be at higher risk; other LAS patients are at lower risk but may still develop AIDS.

(JAMA 1987;257:335-337)

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