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Article
April 3, 1987

Ambulatory Management of Thromboembolic Disease During Pregnancy With Continuous Infusion of Heparin

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, RI.

From the Department of Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, RI.

JAMA. 1987;257(13):1790-1791. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390130108039
Abstract

THROMBOEMBOLIC events related to pregnancy are not uncommon. Retrospective studies have shown an incidence as high as one in 70 pregnancies when thrombophlebitis of either the superficial or deep venous systems occurring in the antepartum or postpartum period is considered.1 The following report describes continuous intravenous (IV) infusion of heparin sodium in the ambulatory setting, an uncommon approach to treating these patients.

Report of a Case  A 32-year-old woman with a history of a documented pulmonary embolus while receiving oral contraceptives and a previously uneventful pregnancy was admitted to the hospital in the eighth week of gestation, with pain and swelling of the right lower extremity. Plethysmographic and Doppler study results suggested acute obstruction in the right popliteal system and further diagnostic studies were not pursued. A bolus of 5000 units of heparin sodium was given, followed by a continuous infusion of approximately 1000 U/h for eight days. There

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