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Article
June 12, 1987

Intravitreous Ganciclovir for Patients Receiving Zidovudine

Author Affiliations

St Paul—Ramsey Medical Center University of Minnesota Medical School Minneapolis
University of Minnesota Medical School Minneapolis
Group Health Inc Minneapolis

St Paul—Ramsey Medical Center University of Minnesota Medical School Minneapolis
University of Minnesota Medical School Minneapolis
Group Health Inc Minneapolis

JAMA. 1987;257(22):3066. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390220064012
Abstract

To the Editor.—  Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been recognized to have a high incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis, which is often bilateral.1 Treatment with ganciclovir producing systemic effects can often improve the retinitis, but long-term maintenance therapy is required. One of the systemic side effects of ganciclovir therapy is bone marrow suppression, which has been noted in 25% to 30% of patients.2 As highlighted in two recent issues of American Medical News,3,4 patients who have CMV retinitis and AIDS may be faced with a frightening dilemma. On the one hand, they may qualify for treatment with zidovudine, which may improve their clinical condition and prolong their lives. On the other hand, CMV retinitis can be rapidly progressive and result in blindness. Treatment with ganciclovir producing systemic effects excludes patients from many of the present protocols involving zidovudine. We recently have treated CMV retinitis in

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