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Article
September 11, 1987

The Relative Impact of Smoking and Oral Contraceptive Use on Women in the United States

Author Affiliations

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveys Group
From the Behavioral Epidemiology and Evaluation Branch, Division of Health Education (Drs Goldbaum and Kendrick), and the Division of Nutrition (Mr Hogelin and Ms Gentry), Center for Health Promotion and Education, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta. Dr Goldbaum is now with the Division of Field Services, Epidemiology Program Office, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta.

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveys Group
From the Behavioral Epidemiology and Evaluation Branch, Division of Health Education (Drs Goldbaum and Kendrick), and the Division of Nutrition (Mr Hogelin and Ms Gentry), Center for Health Promotion and Education, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta. Dr Goldbaum is now with the Division of Field Services, Epidemiology Program Office, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta.

JAMA. 1987;258(10):1339-1342. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400100073023
Abstract

Women who smoke and use oral contraceptives (OCs) are at increased risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. To study the prevalence of smoking and OC use and of other behaviors affecting health, 28 states and the District of Columbia conducted telephone surveys during 1981 through 1983. More than 22 000 US adults were interviewed, of whom 5779 women aged 18 to 44 years were studied. Data were weighted to represent the US population. Overall, 7.4% of US women aged 18 to 44 years reported smoking and using OCs; 1.1% reported smoking 25 or more cigarettes per day while using OCs. Although women aged 18 to 24 years were most likely to smoke and use OCs, combined smoking and OC use contributed substantially to the number of excess cases of myocardial infarctions occurring among US women aged 35 to 44 years. However, regardless of OC use, smoking accounted for most of the excess cases. Therefore, health care providers need to intensify their efforts to reduce smoking among their patients.

(JAMA 1987;258:1339-1342)

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