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Article
October 9, 1987

Cardiac Rehabilitation

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Northwestern University Medical School, and the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago.

From the Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Northwestern University Medical School, and the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago.

JAMA. 1987;258(14):1937-1938. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400140099035
Abstract

THE TREATMENT of patients with coronary heart disease has changed markedly in the past 30 years. Not only have drug therapy and surgical options improved outcome, but the activity and exercise levels recommended to patients have become much more liberal. In 1956 Paul Wood1 recommended that following myocardial infarction, "Patients should be confined to bed at once and should remain there for three to six weeks, or longer, according to the severity of the illness...." He makes no mention of subsequent exercise for patients with coronary heart disease. In 1961 activity for the patient soon after myocardial infarction was being liberalized, although with much trepidation, and electrocardiographic monitoring was being recommended for patients as they progressed through various activities of daily living.2 Friedberg3 in his 1966 text still recommended two to three weeks in bed and an additional period of three to four weeks in the hospital for

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