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Article
December 11, 1987

The Deprofessionalization of Medicine: Causes, Effects, and Responses

Author Affiliations

From The Reed Medical Group, Chartered (Dr Reed) and the Department of Sociology, University of Kansas (Dr Evans), Lawrence, Kan.

From The Reed Medical Group, Chartered (Dr Reed) and the Department of Sociology, University of Kansas (Dr Evans), Lawrence, Kan.

JAMA. 1987;258(22):3279-3282. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03400220079041
Abstract

In this article, we examine the components of medical professionalism; identify the roots of the loss of professional autonomy by physicians in the United States—a process that, in effect, is leading to the deprofessionalization of American medicine; discuss why such deprofessionalization is undesirable for the society; and explore three health care delivery systems and their effects on deprofessionalization. We suggest that a system based on organizations set up and directed by physicians will be the system that best preserves medical professionalism and serves the public interest.

(JAMA 1987;258:3279-3282)

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