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Article
January 8, 1988

Screening Newborns for Hemoglobinopathies-Reply

Author Affiliations

Chairperson, Consensus Conference, Newborn Screening for Sickle Cell Disease and Other Hemoglobinopathies St Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center New York

Chairperson, Consensus Conference, Newborn Screening for Sickle Cell Disease and Other Hemoglobinopathies St Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center New York

JAMA. 1988;259(2):219. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03720020021026
Abstract

In Reply.  —Dr Goldman's point is well taken. He advocates a screening approach that has been tried in the past and that was presented to the panelists at the time of the Consensus Conference but that was not explicitly discussed in the report.The consensus statement does emphasize that prenatal maternal screening should be performed early in pregnancy. Testing the mother occasionally uncovers undiagnosed sickle cell disease,1 a fact of great importance to the obstetrician. It also provides essential genetic information to the family in time to permit testing of the father and antenatal diagnosis of the fetus, should it be desired.A program could be structured to use this maternal information to identify the specific infant at risk for sickle cell disease, who can then be selectively tested after birth. As Dr Goldman states, the mother's blood must be subjected to electrophoresis so that all abnormal hemoglobins can

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