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Article
February 5, 1988

Complete Resolution of Pure Red Cell Aplasia in a Patient With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Following Antithymocyte Globulin Therapy

Author Affiliations

From the Section of Hematology/Oncology, Departments of Medicine (Drs Radosevich, Gordon, Weil, and Rosen) and Pathology (Drs Weil and Marder), Northwestern University; and Lakeside Veterans Administration Medical Center (Dr Gordon), Chicago.

From the Section of Hematology/Oncology, Departments of Medicine (Drs Radosevich, Gordon, Weil, and Rosen) and Pathology (Drs Weil and Marder), Northwestern University; and Lakeside Veterans Administration Medical Center (Dr Gordon), Chicago.

JAMA. 1988;259(5):723-725. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03720050059024
Abstract

Pure red cell aplasia has been reported to be associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. It has been proposed that this complication may be a result of T-cell populations that suppress erythropoiesis. It has been postulated that antithymocyte globulin might reverse this abnormality by eliminating the population of suppressor T cells responsible for this inhibition. We treated a 74-year-old man who had B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and pure red cell aplasia that was refractory to cytotoxic and corticosteroid therapy with equine antithymocyte globulin and methylprednisolone sodium succinate. This therapy resulted in a durable complete remission of both the chronic lymphocytic leukemia and the pure red cell aplasia and was associated with normalization of helper/suppressor T-cell ratios in the bone marrow. Antithymocyte globulin should be investigated further as a therapeutic modality for patients with pure red cell aplasia associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

(JAMA 1988;259:723-725)

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