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Article
February 19, 1988

Diagnosis and Treatment of AphasiaPart I

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Neurology (Dr Albert) and Audiology and Speech Pathology (Dr Helm-Estabrooks), Aphasia Research Center, Boston University Medical School and Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center.

From the Departments of Neurology (Dr Albert) and Audiology and Speech Pathology (Dr Helm-Estabrooks), Aphasia Research Center, Boston University Medical School and Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center.

JAMA. 1988;259(7):1043-1047. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03720070043032
Abstract

IN 1971, Norman Geschwind1 complained that the problem of aphasia was largely neglected by clinicians, despite its common occurrence. During the past 15 years, in great measure due to Geschwind's creative inspiration, clinicians and researchers have devoted considerable energy to understanding brain-language relationships and to developing new therapies for aphasic patients. With advances in imaging technologies and development of the fields of behavioral neurology, neuropsychology, psycholinguistics, and speech pathology, great progress has been made. Aphasia is no longer a neglected subject, and many aphasic patients now can be successfully treated. Contemporary research attempts to elucidate cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms underlying aphasic symptoms and to apply this knowledge to the development of therapy programs directed at specific clusters of aphasic symptoms. This article highlights clinically relevant aspects of this research.

PREVALENCE OF APHASIA  Approximately 85 000 new cases of aphasia occur in the United States each year from stroke alone.

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