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Article
May 20, 1988

Spermicide Use and Sexually Transmitted Disease

Author Affiliations

Family Health International Research Triangle Park Branch Durham, NC
New York
American Social Health Association Research Triangle Park, NC

Family Health International Research Triangle Park Branch Durham, NC
New York
American Social Health Association Research Triangle Park, NC

JAMA. 1988;259(19):2851. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03720190023022
Abstract

To the Editor.  —Spermicides are active in vitro against organisms that cause a variety of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs),1 and clinical studies suggest that spermicide use reduces the risk of endocervical gonococcal and chlamydial infections.2 To examine the effect of using spermicidal contraceptives on trichomoniasis, bacterial vaginosis, and candidiasis, we performed a cross-sectional study of women who attended a large reproductive health clinic.

Methods.  —The records of women who attended the gynecology and STD services of Planned Parenthood of New York City between July 1983 and March 1984 were reviewed. Spermicide users included all women who reported current use of any combination of spermicides, with or without barrier devices. Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed from clue cells or Gram's stains; trichomoniasis and candidiasis were diagnosed by wet mount.3 Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for spermicide users compared with oral contraceptive users were computed using the BMDP

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