[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 22, 1988

Unique Vascular Skin Lesions Associated With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Dermatology (Drs Knobler, Silvers, and Grossman), Medicine (Dr Fine), and Pathology (Drs Silvers and Lefkowitch), College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York.

From the Departments of Dermatology (Drs Knobler, Silvers, and Grossman), Medicine (Dr Fine), and Pathology (Drs Silvers and Lefkowitch), College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York.

JAMA. 1988;260(4):524-527. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410040096035
Abstract

We report four patients with antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who were noted to have unique vascular lesions that clinically resembled Kaposi's sarcoma or pyogenic granulomas. The lesions were asymptomatic erythematous-violaceous papules and nodules. They erupted over several weeks, without predilection for a specific cutaneous site. Most lesions resolved spontaneously. Histologically these lesions revealed a proliferation of vascular spaces lined by plump, cuboidal endothelial cells embedded in an edematous stroma with an inflammatory infiltrate. It is unclear if these lesions represent Kaposi's sarcoma or pyogenic granulomas or if they are distinct neoplasms associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

(JAMA 1988;260:524-527)

×