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Article
September 9, 1988

Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice

Author Affiliations

University Hospital Emergency Medical Services University of Washington Seattle

University Hospital Emergency Medical Services University of Washington Seattle

JAMA. 1988;260(10):1471-1472. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410100161048
Abstract

A reader gets an overwhelming sense when reading this book that the authors have been there. Dr Rosen and his coeditors have continued the approach so welcomed in their first edition in 1983 of selecting only practicing emergency physicians as contributors. This produces a work that appeals to the "urban cowboy" syndrome in emergency medicine—the ED doc (emergency department physician) as the person of experience, practicality, and clinical acumen, attuned to the subtleties of patient behavior, possessing a slight patina of cynicism but with an underlying warmth, humanity, and a cheerful sense of rising to the challenge of whatever comes through the ED doors.

The ED doc is unencumbered by the compulsive, overly sophisticated work-ups required "upstairs." Instead, he or she asks first, "How much time do I have to act, and how much to think?... Left unattended, how soon will this patient die?" The ED physician must face and

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