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Article
September 16, 1988

Long-term Use of Nicotine Chewing GumOccurrence, Determinants, and Effect on Weight Gain

Author Affiliations

From the Addiction Research Unit, Institute of Psychiatry, University of London.

From the Addiction Research Unit, Institute of Psychiatry, University of London.

JAMA. 1988;260(11):1593-1596. doi:10.1001/jama.1988.03410110101035
Abstract

Among 538 clients of a Smokers Clinic who were treated with 2-mg nicotine chewing gum, 34 (6.3%) were still using the gum at one-year follow-up. This group represented 25% of lapse-free abstainers. At one-year follow-up, long-term gum users were using an average of 6.8 pieces of gum per day. Long-term gum users were similar to treatment failures in cigarette consumption and tobacco dependence, while "gum-free" successes were significantly lighter and less-dependent smokers. Long-term gum users used more gum during the four weeks of treatment than treatment failures, who in turn used more than the gum-free successes. It is suggested that for many the long-term use of gum was an essential ingredient of their success. Long-term gum users gained significantly less weight than other long-term treatment successes.

(JAMA 1988;260:1593-1596)

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