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Article
January 6, 1989

The Making of a Smoke-free Medical Center

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Community Internal Medicine (Drs Hurt and Berge), the Section of Biostatistics (Mr Offord), and the Section of Communications (Mr O'Hara), Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation; Administration(Mr Leonard) and Educational Services (Ms Renquist), Saint Marys Hospital; and Nursing Services (Ms Gerlach), Rochester Methodist Hospital, Rochester, Minn.

From the Division of Community Internal Medicine (Drs Hurt and Berge), the Section of Biostatistics (Mr Offord), and the Section of Communications (Mr O'Hara), Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation; Administration(Mr Leonard) and Educational Services (Ms Renquist), Saint Marys Hospital; and Nursing Services (Ms Gerlach), Rochester Methodist Hospital, Rochester, Minn.

JAMA. 1989;261(1):95-97. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420010105042
Abstract

The concept of smoke-free medical facilities is in its formative stages, and such policies have received broad support. Although smoking has been restricted at Mayo Medical Center for many years, in 1986 it was decided that the medical center should become smoke free. This report summarizes the methods used in developing and implementing a smoke-free policy. This experience suggests that with proper planning, the implementation can be smooth. The message being given to patients and staff concerning the health risk of smoking is now more consistent, and there has been wide acceptance of the policy by staff and patients. It is concluded that such a policy can be effectively implemented, if it is well planned and supported.

(JAMA 1989;261:95-97)

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