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Article
March 3, 1989

Mandatory Reporting of HIV Testing Would Deter Men From Being Tested

Author Affiliations

University of California School of Medicine San Francisco

University of California School of Medicine San Francisco

JAMA. 1989;261(9):1275-1276. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420090039012
Abstract

To the Editor.—  People at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are less likely to seek testing when it is offered confidentially rather than anonymously.1,2 Some propose that positive test results be reported to public health officials and that testing be required to receive specific health care services. However, this may draw people away from testing because of concerns about loss of health insurance and discrimination. Some might forgo health care if testing was required.3

Study.—  Our longitudinal sample of homosexual men (N = 574) has been described previously.4 The majority (56.2%) have obtained human immunodeficiency virus antibody testing. Respondents were presented with two scenarios (they are seeking care for AIDS/AIDS-related complex symptoms and seeking testing for venereal disease) and were asked if they would (1) consent to antibody testing if results had to be reported to public health officials and (2) seek health care if testing was

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