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Article
March 3, 1989

Sports Medicine: Fitness, Training, Injuries

JAMA. 1989;261(9):1345. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420090111043
Abstract

This book was received for review with high expectations since millions of people have become active in recreational and competitive sports and almost all of them need some advice on how to train safely as well as efficiently. Most adequate advice comes from physicians, physiologists, coaches, physical educators, psychologists, trainers, etc, who have themselves been active in diverse sports and thus have become familiar with aspects of physical conditioning, training, and prevention of and rehabilitation from injuries.

If this book was intended to serve as a text for a graduate course in sports medicine, it falls somewhat short of that purpose. It starts out with a not quite pertinent introduction by Dr Ernst Jokl, who from his longtime sports-medical background could have provided historic aspects of the development of sports medicine as it is understood today.

In the book's contents the authors follow closely the outlines used in Professor A.

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