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Article
March 10, 1989

Clindamycin for Staphylococcal Skin Infections in AIDS-Reply

Author Affiliations

Tufts University School of Medicine New England Medical Center Hospital Boston, Mass

Tufts University School of Medicine New England Medical Center Hospital Boston, Mass

JAMA. 1989;261(10):1444-1445. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420100078023
Abstract

In Reply. —  It is convenient to think of patients with unusually frequent Staphylococcus aureus infections in three categories: patients with recurrent superficial skin infections, which occur in apparently normal hosts and almost never disseminate; patients who experience visceral infections because their skin or mucous membrane barriers are somehow circumvented and staphylococci temporarily overwhelm an otherwise intact phagocyte host defense system; and patients who usually have intact barriers but in whom even minor superficial staphylococcal infections cannot be contained because of gross abnormalities in neutrophil function. Patients in the first group were the subject of our recent article. Despite an enormous number of recurrent S aureus skin abscesses (18.6 ± 3.3 abscesses per patient prior to entry into the study), no patient had a history of a visceral or disseminated staphylococcal infection and neutrophil function was normal in all patients tested. As we reported in our study, prophylactic antibiotics given

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