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Article
April 7, 1989

Outcomes of Surgery in Patients 90 Years of Age and Older

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Anesthesiology (Drs Hosking, Warner, and Lobdell) and Health Sciences Research (Mr Offord and Dr Melton), Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minn.

From the Departments of Anesthesiology (Drs Hosking, Warner, and Lobdell) and Health Sciences Research (Mr Offord and Dr Melton), Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minn.

JAMA. 1989;261(13):1909-1915. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420130077027
Abstract

During the 11-year period 1975 through 1985, seven hundred ninety-five patients 90 years of age and older underwent operative procedures at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Overall serious morbidity within 48 hours after surgery was 9.4%, and the mortality was 1.6%. The 30-day, 1-year, and 5-year mortality rates were 8.4%, 31.4%, and 78.8%, respectively. Short-term morbidity and both short- and long-term mortality were highly associated with the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification of the patient. Emergency procedures carried a significantly higher risk for morbidity and mortality within the 48-hour period and, to a lesser extent, for long-term mortality. Overall, poorer patient survival was associated with higher American Society of Anesthesiologists class; male sex; preoperative renal, liver, and central nervous system impairment; and surgery on the mouth, nose, or pharynx. When compared with age-, sex-, and calendar Year-matched peers from the general population, there was a modest decrease in patient survival at 1 year that reversed by 2 years, with observed survival at 5 years comparable to the rate expected.

(JAMA. 1989;261:1909-1915)

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