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Article
August 27, 1982

Clinical Laboratory Methods

JAMA. 1982;248(8):991. doi:10.1001/jama.1982.03330080065036

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Abstract

The history of the clinical laboratory is mirrored in textbooks describing laboratory methods. In the preface to the first edition of this book published in 1936, Dr W. E. Bray stated, "The object of this synopsis is to bring together in a small volume for ready reference the more recent information and the most frequently used methods of laboratory diagnosis."

Dr Bauer, with Dr Gelson Toro and Dr Philip G. Ackermann, assumed editorial responsibility for the sixth edition in 1962, and since then he has adhered to Dr Bray's objective, much to the benefit of the many users of this textbook. Over the past 20 years, tests such as the basal metabolic rate and entire chapters, such as one on water and milk examination, have disappeared, to be replaced by descriptions of the human leukocyte antigen system, methods for immunoglobulin measurements, and the use of chromogenic substrates to quantitate coagulation

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