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Article
May 5, 1989

Mammographic Screening in Asymptomatic Women Aged 40 Years and Older

Author Affiliations

From the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, Chicago, III.

From the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, Chicago, III.

JAMA. 1989;261(17):2535-2542. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03420170079034
Abstract

Currently, age-specific recommendations for screening mammograms in asymptomatic women that have been developed by professional, voluntary, and governmental organizations differ. While there is strong epidemiologic evidence that mammographic screening in asymptomatic women aged 50 years or older reduces breast cancer mortality, the evidence for mortality reduction is not as clear for women aged 40 to 49 years. However, as described in this report, findings of further mortality and survival follow-up of subjects in earlier studies, as well as observations from more recent studies, suggest reductions in mortality and better survival in younger women as well. While mammography is currently the most effective method for detecting early breast cancers, some breast cancers may develop during the intervals between screening mammograms. The costs of mammographic screening also require consideration in the process of making national screening recommendations.

(JAMA. 1989;261:2535-2542)

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