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Article
July 28, 1989

The Lead-Exposed Worker

Author Affiliations

From the California Occupational Health Program, California Department of Health Services, Berkeley.

From the California Occupational Health Program, California Department of Health Services, Berkeley.

JAMA. 1989;262(4):532-534. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03430040104034
Abstract

The lead standard established by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration in 1978 requires physicians and employers to follow very specific guidelines when treating lead-exposed workers. For example, if a worker's blood lead level is 2.90 μmol/L of whole blood or greater, the worker must be removed from work, with full pay and retention of seniority, until the blood level falls below 1.95 μmol/L. Physicians play a key role in the implementation of the lead standard; the standard specifies frequency of blood lead measurements, frequency and extent of medical monitoring, and medical removal from work. This article reviews the lead standard as it applies to physicians and makes recommendations about managing the worker with lead poisoning.

(JAMA. 1989;262:532-534)

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