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Article
August 11, 1989

The Impact of a Total Ban on Smoking in The Johns Hopkins Children's Center

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Medicine (Drs Becker and Stillman), Preventive Medicine Program (Dr Conner and Ms Pennington), Psychiatry (Dr Waranch), Environmental Health Sciences (Dr Lees), and Pediatrics (Dr Oski), The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Md.

From the Departments of Medicine (Drs Becker and Stillman), Preventive Medicine Program (Dr Conner and Ms Pennington), Psychiatry (Dr Waranch), Environmental Health Sciences (Dr Lees), and Pediatrics (Dr Oski), The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Md.

JAMA. 1989;262(6):799-802. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03430060095032
Abstract

We report the results of a ban on smoking in The Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore, Md, beginning in July 1987. A survey 6 months before and 6 months after implementation of the ban showed current smoking prevalences to be 15% and 13.8%, respectively. The percentage of smokers who smoked at work declined from 82% before the ban to 43% after the ban. After the ban, 66% of smokers and 93% of nonsmokers agreed that a hospital should be smoke free, while 43% and 83%, respectively, agreed with this statement before the ban. Systematic observations showed a decline from 53% of visitors and staff smoking in public areas 1 month before the ban to 0% smoking 6 months after the ban. Twenty-four—hour cigarette butt counts in elevator lobbies located well within the center dropped from 940 for an average day to 19 for an average day 6 months after the ban. Finally, measurement of environmental nicotine vapor showed a decline from a weekly average concentration of 13 μg/m3 of nicotine 1 month prior to the ban to 0.51 μg/m3 of nicotine 6 months after the ban in nine lobby lounges. The results suggest that a total ban on smoking in a hospital is feasible and effective in virtually eliminating public smoking.

(JAMA. 1989;262:799-802)

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