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Article
December 8, 1989

Comparison of Lovastatin and Gemfibrozil in Normolipidemic Patients With Hypoalphalipoproteinemia

Author Affiliations

From the Center for Human Nutrition (Drs Vega and Grundy), Departments of Clinical Nutrition (Drs Vega and Grundy), Internal Medicine (Dr Grundy), and Biochemistry (Dr Grundy), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas; and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Dallas, Tex (Drs Vega and Grundy).

From the Center for Human Nutrition (Drs Vega and Grundy), Departments of Clinical Nutrition (Drs Vega and Grundy), Internal Medicine (Dr Grundy), and Biochemistry (Dr Grundy), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas; and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Dallas, Tex (Drs Vega and Grundy).

JAMA. 1989;262(22):3148-3153. doi:10.1001/jama.1989.03430220071033
Abstract

This study compared lovastatin and gemfibrozil therapy for effects on lipid and lipoprotein levels in 22 normolipidemic patients with reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Most patients had coronary heart disease. A randomized, crossover design consisted of two drug phases (lovastatin and gemfibrozil) alternating with placebo. Lovastatin reduced total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels by 28%, 34%, and 24%, respectively. These were unaffected by gemfibrozil. Both drugs reduced very low—density lipoprotein and intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 30% to 40%. Both caused small but significant increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but not in apolipoproteins A-I or A-II. Both significantly lowered ratios of total (and low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol—to—high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but lovastatin more than gemfibrozil. Thus, for normolipidemic patients with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, neither drug markedly raised high-density lipoprotein levels, but lovastatin produced the better overall change in lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels.

(JAMA. 1989;262:3148-3153)

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