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Article
September 5, 1990

Frequency of Adverse Reactions to Influenza Vaccine in the Elderly: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Author Affiliations

From the Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minn (Dr Margolis); Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minn (Drs Nichol and Pluhar); and Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minn (Dr Poland).

From the Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minn (Dr Margolis); Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minn (Drs Nichol and Pluhar); and Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minn (Dr Poland).

JAMA. 1990;264(9):1139-1141. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450090075029
Abstract

Concern about side effects constitutes a major deterrent to patient compliance with influenza vaccination, yet there is a paucity of data about the occurrence of adverse reactions in the population targeted for immunization. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial to compare the frequency of adverse reactions following administration of 1988-1989 trivalent split-antigen influenza vaccine and saline placebo. Outpatient veterans 65 years of age or over (n = 336) were recruited by mail and were randomly assigned to receive vaccine followed 2 weeks later by placebo injection or placebo followed 2 weeks later by vaccine. There was no significant difference between influenza vaccine and placebo with respect to the proportion of subjects reporting disability or systemic symptoms.

(JAMA. 1990;264:1139-1141)

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