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Article
November 3, 1883

Specialties, and Their Ethical Relations.

JAMA. 1883;I(17):511-512. doi:10.1001/jama.1883.02390170019003
Abstract

—Twice, within a short time, has the editor of this journal been applied to for information (and many other times in years past) in regard to the questions, "How far, and in what way, can those members of the profession who are desirous of pursuing a special practice, or, in other words, limiting their practice to certain diseases or the affections of certain organs, make known their position by cards or advertisements without violating the National Code of Ethics?" The highly intelligent sources from which these inquiries have come, render it probable that only a small number in the profession know the answers that have been given at different times by direct action of the American Medical Association. It is well known that the National Code of Ethics contains no allusion to specialties, in the sense that the word is now used, but simply declares it to be " derogatory to

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