[Skip to Navigation]
Sign In
Article
April 12, 1884

THE MILK SUPPLY OF BOSTON, AND THE BENEFIT TO BE DERIVED FROM THE SPAYING OF COWS.

JAMA. 1884;II(15):402-404. doi:10.1001/jama.1884.04360020010002

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The milk supply of Boston may be divided into three classes: first, that brought in on the cars, and commonly called railroad milk; second, that brought in wagons from the surrounding country, and called out-of-town milk; third, that from cows kept within the city limits. Each one of these may be divided into three classes: first, from the new milch cow; second, from the farrow cow, or one that has been milked for a year or more; third, from a springer, or one with calf. The nature of the new milk is very loosening; it is well known among farmers that the first milkings given to a calf three or four weeks will scour it to death. This milk changes as it increases in age, until at the end of a year the milk of a farrow cow becomes very astringent. This milk, if given to a calf a week

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
Add or change institution
×