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Article
July 19, 1884

IRREGULAR APOPLECTIC ATTACKS, DUE TO OTHER CAUSES THAN HÆMORRHAGE AND EMBOLISM.

JAMA. 1884;III(3):57-59. doi:10.1001/jama.1884.02390520001001

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Abstract

Presented in the Section on Practice of Medicine and Materia Medica of American Medical Association, May, 1884.

The term "apoplectic attack" is employed in the title of this paper to denote the sudden onset of a train of symptoms in which unconsciousness, hemiplegia and convulsions are more or less prominent. Many writers have used the word apoplexy to express a certain form of hæmorrhage, as in the terms renal apoplexy and pulmonary apoplexy; in this paper it will not be used in that sense, but will always be taken to mean the symptoms described, without reference to their causation.

The investigations of modern pathologists have clearly established the relation of apoplexy to the various forms of cerebral hæmorrhage, embolism and thrombosis, and have enabled us to distinguish between those conditions with considerable accuracy. We now understand that unconsciousness is usually most profound in cerebral hæmorrhage; that consciousness may be preserved

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