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October 4, 1884

ON RAILROAD INJURIES OF THE EXTREMITIES OF THE HUMAN BODY, WITH OBSERVATIONS ON THE SITE OF AMPUTATION, AND SUBSEQUENT TREATMENT OF THE STUMP.

JAMA. 1884;III(14):372-376. doi:10.1001/jama.1884.02390630008001a

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Abstract

The consideration of severe injuries of the extremities of the human body, the result of railroad accidents, and, indeed, of all crushing blows inflicted by great momentum, is the topic which I have selected for discussion on this occasion.

I shall consider their proximate trauma, also their effects on the heart and great vessels.

For their effects on the nervous system I refer you to the antagonistic works of Erichsen and Page.

Lastly, I shall offer a few observations on the subject of amputations and the after treatment of the stump, also the reports of a few cases bearing on the subject under discussion.

In the good old days of stage-coaching, when the travel, as a rule, was limited to nine inside and three outside including the driver; when the speed of 12 miles an hour was a marvel, an occasional upset seldom resulted in more than a simple fracture,

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