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May 30, 1885

THE EFFECT OF THE SALINE INGREDIENTS OF THE BLOOD UPON THE CONTRACTIONS OF THE HEART.

JAMA. 1885;IV(22):607-608. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02390970019004

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Abstract

Such is the title of a paper by Dr. Sidney Ringer in the British Medical Journal, of April 11, 1885. It is very well known that if blood or an artificial circulating fluid be sent through the cavities of a frog's heart, entirely detached from the body, the heart will continue to beat for some hours; and that this is also true of portions of the heart, as the lower third of the ventricle, which has long been supposed to be free from nervous ganglia. " Here, then, we have a means of testing with facility the immediate action of a drug on the whole heart, on the ventricle, or on a portion of the ventricle." He proposes, in this communication, to describe the behavior, " in physiological doses, of the natural salts of the circulation—the salts proper to the blood itself—on the frog's ventricle."

When pure water is made to flow

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