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Article
June 27, 1885

ADDRESS IN DENTAL AND ORAL SURGERY.DELIVERED IN GENERAL SESSION AT THE THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

Author Affiliations

OF CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1885;IV(26):705-706. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391010005001a
Abstract

The introduction of cocaine as a local anæsthetic, and the more general use of peroxide of hydrogen (H2 O2) in the treatment of dental and oral diseases, are the principal advances made in the medical department of this practice during the year for which this report is made.

The two forms of cocaine which have been most generally used in surgery are the hydrochlorate and the oleate. In operations in the mouth involving the mucous membranes, together with the immediately subjacent tissues, these preparations of the drug have proven so efficient that there is little question as to its value as a local anæsthetic in such cases. But its action upon deeper structures, such as involve the roots of teeth, is so uncertain as to render its practical benefits questionable in the operation of extraction. In the surgical treatment of pockets caused by pyorrhea alveolaris, the anæsthetic effect of this

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