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Article
August 13, 1887

THREE CASES OF SYMPATHETIC OPHTHALMITIS ARRESTED BY EARLY ENUCLEATION OF THE INJURED EYE.Read before the Chicago Medical Society, May 2, 1887.

JAMA. 1887;IX(7):203-206. doi:10.1001/jama.1887.02400060011001d
Abstract

A few years ago a writer in the Archives of Opthalmology (vol. xi, p. 209) asserted that it could be definitely settled "that the enucleation of the injured eye does not arrest or shorten the course of sympathetic inflammation." But we need only to begin to look into the literature or to ask the views of several oculists to convince ourselves that the greatest difference of opinion still exists in regard to the propriety of removing the injured eyeball after sympathetic inflammation has started in the other eye. Mauthner, for instance, takes the ground that under these circumstances the operation is not only useless, but in certain forms of sympathetic inflammation positively harmful; while Wecker, on the contrary, declares these views are not borne out by clinical facts, and insists that the operation should be performed in the early stage of sympathetic ophthalmitis.

When men entertain and express such opposite

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