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Article
July 17, 1886

ELECTROLYSIS IN GYNECOLOGY; WITH A REPORT OF THREE CASES OF FIBROID TUMOR SUCCESSFULLY TREATED BY THE METHOD (WITH DISCUSSION).

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO, PROFESSOR OF GYNECOLOGY IN CHICAGO POLICLINIC; FELLOW OF THE CHICAGO GYNECOLOGICAL SOCIETY, ETC.

JAMA. 1886;VII(3):61-68. doi:10.1001/jama.1886.04250070069002
Abstract

Electrolysis is the power of resolving compound bodies into their constituent elements by passing through them a current of electricity. The constituent elements or ions of a body or electrolyte so divided, have a general tendency to arrange themselves around either pole of the battery—the anions going to the positive and the cations to the negative. Electrolysis only occurs in that part of the body which is in a fluid state. We know that if a galvanic current be passed through water, the element oxygen is attracted by the positive, and the hydrogen by the negative pole. The theory of electrolysis is: In every compound one of the elements (the one attracted by the positive pole) is electro-negative, the other the electro-positive. If a molecule next the positive electrode be decomposed, the electro-negative constituent of the molecule is attracted by that pole, thereby setting free the electro-positive constituent, which immediately

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