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Article
September 11, 1886

THE EFFECTS OF CERTAIN PHILOSOPHICAL PRINCIPLES THAT HAVE NOT BEEN NOTICED, IN AID OF THE CIRCULATION OF THE BLOOD.

Author Affiliations

ROCKLAND, ME.

JAMA. 1886;VII(11):287-289. doi:10.1001/jama.1886.04250090035002
Abstract

I assume that the subject of the circulation of the blood is not so well understood in the minds of the best scholars and physiologists, that light from a source that has no great pretensions to study and investigation would not be acceptable. I propose to treat the subject in the light of certain philosophical principles, self-evident facts that need no demonstration from experiment. I need not recapitulate all that is known and believed in relation to the circulation of the blood.

I commence with the subject of cohesion. "Blood has greater cohesion than water." This expression is used2 in reference to the increase of friction caused by the increased area of the walls in the branches of an artery. I claim there is no difference in the cohesion of liquids. Cohesion is a peculiar property of all liquids, whereby they resemble the character of solids when acted upon

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