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January 1, 1887

A COMPLETE ORGANIZATION OF THE MEDICAL PROFESSION, AND HOW TO ATTAIN IT.

JAMA. 1887;VIII(1):15-16. doi:10.1001/jama.1887.02391260023003

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Abstract

"We want 80,000 doctors enrolled under one Constitution and By-laws believing that their common interests are faithfully looked after by the great central body. Perhaps such a hope is Utopian. But we are sanguine enough to believe that it can be wrought out, and must be if the American profession shall attain the power to which it is entitled."—American Lancet, p. 422, for November, 1886.

The above paragraph from an editorial in our valuable contemporary simply expresses the desire to have the entire number of members of the regular profession of medicine in the United States actually enrolled under one general organization, and a degree of confidence that it can be practically accomplished. The idea of such an enrollment or nominal membership of the whole profession under one Constitution and By-laws, to be governed by a comparatively small select Council or Senate, is not new, but was the fundamental

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