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Article
December 10, 1887

RAPID DILATATION OF THE CERVIX UTERI; ITS AGENCY IN THE TREATMENT OF FLEXIONS, STRICTURE, CHRONIC ENDO-TRACHELITIS, CONICAL CERVIX, DYSMENORRHŒA.Read before the St. Louis Medical Society, Nov. 26, 1887.

JAMA. 1887;IX(24):749-752. doi:10.1001/jama.1887.02400230013002e

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Abstract

To Dr. Mackintosh, of Edinburgh, is due the credit of having first directed the attention of the profession to the mechanical cause of certain cases of dysmenorrhœa, and the suggestion of mechanical means for its relief, consisting of gradual dilatation of the cervical canal by means of flexible bougies, or by metallic rods of gradually increasing volume.

Rigby was the first to use a dilator with steel blades, which were opened and left for some time in the cervix. Raynaud, of Montauban, Simpson, Sims, and others sought to accomplish the same ends by the use of different materials, as dilators, such as metallic stems, wax bougies, aluminum and other metals. Simpson and Sims lived to repudiate this method of treatment, and substituted therefor incisions. In 1871, Dr. J. Protheroe Smith, of London, in setting forth his plan of treating certain cases of dysmenorrhœa and sterility, said that after giving Dr.

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