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Article
April 30, 1887

A NOTE ON TANNIC ACID AS A SURGICAL DRESSING.

JAMA. 1887;VIII(18):487. doi:10.1001/jama.1887.02391430011002b

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Abstract

Tannic acid forms an excellent dressing in three classes of wounds, viz.:

1. Incised wounds—applied after the sutures are inserted, or adhesive plaster is on—if the wound does not require stitching.

2. Small wounds of irregular form and recent occurrence.

3. Wounds of moderate size in compound factures. Wherever applicable it excels all other dressings in the following respects:

1. Convenience.

2. Cheapness.

3. Cleanliness.

4. Efficiency.

It is always ready. It costs but a trifle. It requires no greasy mixing, measuring or muddling and has neither smut nor smell. While of its efficiency I can only say after sixteen years use that I am satisfied: I ask nothing better. I first called attention to this neat, choice dressing in an article entitled "Fifty Fractures in Mining Surgery," which appeared in the Medical and Surgical Reporter for September, 1878.

The method of application is simply to keep the wound covered

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