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Article
January 4, 1908

THE DOMINANT IDEA AS A FACTOR IN PUBLIC HEALTH.

JAMA. 1908;L(1):45-46. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.02530270047010
Abstract

In an article in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal,1 entitled "A Study of Fifty-one Cases of Debility in Jewish Patients," Mr. H. Morrison calls attention to two remarkable illustrations of what one may call the result of diffused suggestion by world thought. We are accustomed to think of the influence of suggestion only as affecting the individual in an acute stage, so to speak; that is, as the result of some direct exciting cause, acting on him either alone or in company with many others subject at the same time to the influence of the same suggestion ("crowd suggestion"). But there is a far more subtle form of suggestion, which undoubtedly affects the physical and psychical conditions of whole groups of people, that of a common traditional belief. Mr. Morrison's instances referred to are given in his report of an investigation into the environments of a number of

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