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Article
May 7, 1887

CLINICAL LECTURE

JAMA. 1887;VIII(19):505-509. doi:10.1001/jama.1887.02391440001001
Abstract

ON THE GENERAL PRINCIPLES INVOLVED IN AMPUTATION,  With a Consideration of Some Points in the Technique.BY FREDERIC S. DENNIS, M.D., PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF SURGERY IN THE BELLEVUE HOSPITAL MEDICAL COLLEGE, NEW YORK CITY.[Reported by Seymour II. Houghton, M.D., House Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital.]

Gentlemen:  —The late Sir Wm. Fergusson used to speak of amputation as "one of the meanest, and yet one of the greatest operations in surgery; mean when resorted to if better may be done—great as the only step to give comfort and prolong life." In studying the conditions under which amputations have been resorted to during the past half century, it is astonishing to see how limited in number those conditions are at the present day. Szymanowski once said that "we must reach such a state of perfection in amputation as to consider every amputatation a plastic operation;" and with a view

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