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Article
May 7, 1887

ENTERECTOMY FOR STRANGULATED HERNIA. WITH REPORT OF A CASE.

JAMA. 1887;VIII(19):512-516. doi:10.1001/jama.1887.02391440008002a
Abstract

Has the introduction of antisepsis into surgery improved the results of herniotomy? It is claimed by some that the mortality has been lessened by antiseptic methods. Hamilton says: "Mr. Hey states that he lost three out of every five cases upon whom he operated, but it is my impression that the mortality remains about the same as when Mr. Hey wrote, nearly one hundred years ago."

Bruno Schmidt, (Leipsig) states that the mortality of strangulated hernia before the introduction of Listerism was 45.8 per cent., while the mortality since its introduction has been 36.6 per cent., a reduction of 9.2 per cent.; an improvement not commensurate with the improvement in other abdominal operations. Schmidt accounts for this failure by the parts being already necessarily septic on account of their relations. P. S. Connor reports thirty-three cases of herniotomy, with a death rate of 63.6 per cent., and in but one

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