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Article
January 25, 1908

CALMETTE'S OPHTHALMIC REACTION TO TUBERCULIN.PRELIMINARY REPORT BASED ON TWO HUNDRED AND FORTY-TWO CASES.

JAMA. 1908;L(4):259-267. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310300011001c
Abstract

In June, 1907, Professor Calmette, of Lille, France, described a new method of administering tuberculin for diagnostic purposes. He had observed that when one drop of a 1 per cent. glycerin-free solution (suspension?) of tuberculin, in distilled water, was instilled into the conjunctival sacs of individuals clinically tuberculous, there occurred a more or less characteristic, local, inflammatory reaction. In general, such changes were not noted when the tuberculin preparation was instilled into the conjunctival sacs of persons not clinically tuberculous. This reaction has been called the "opthalmo-", the "oculo-", or the opthalmic, reaction to tuberculin.

Since the preliminary report of Calmette a considerable number of observers, mainly French, have published results of researches on the ophthalmic reaction. As is to be expected, one encounters in their communications some lack of unanimity as to the real diagnostic value of the reaction. Inasmuch as comparatively little work has been reported, it seems

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