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Article
February 1, 1908

CONSERVATIVE OPERATIONS ON BONE TUMORS,BASED ON THE CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC STUDY OF THE RELATIVE DEGREE OF MALIGNANCY.

JAMA. 1908;L(5):325-327. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310310001001
Abstract

The object in the treatment of a bone sarcoma is to insure, if possible, a permanent cure. Amputation is a mutilating operation. The question naturally arises: Can some bone tumors be completely removed without amputation and with the same assurance of a permanent result?

From a personal study, now extending over a number of years, of cases treated in Dr. Halsted's surgical clinic of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and those in my own practice, and of a number communicated to me through the courtesy of colleagues, and collated from the literature, I have found that, with rare exceptions, the permanently cured patients suffered from tumors of similar pathologic anatomy, and such cures were accomplished in properly selected cases by conservative operations just as well as by amputation. In the class of cases in which cures were not accomplished, the pathology of the tumor is very much alike and entirely different

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