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Article
March 7, 1908

SYMPTOMATOLOGY AND DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE ARTICULAR RHEUMATISM.

JAMA. 1908;L(10):739-741. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310360001001
Abstract

Our uncertainty as to the etiology of rheumatism makes impossible an accurate definition of the disease and obliges us often to differentiate it by symptoms alone from allied and closely similar disorders, some of which we know to be caused by definite bacteria.

The disease known as acute articular rheumatism, to which I shall refer hereafter as rheumatism, has been shown to have a definite relation to seasons, a relation which differs in different parts of the world. On our North Atlantic Coast, hospital reports show that a majority of the cases occur between January and April, although Morris J. Lewis finds an exacerbation both of rheumatism and of chorea in the fall also—the favoring seasons being when the humidity is excessive and the barometric pressure low. The Roosevelt Hospital statistics for the past twelve years show 743 cases admitted in the first half-year, against 253 cases in the second

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