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Article
March 21, 1908

INJURIES OF THE SPINAL CORD,WITH THE STUDY OF NINE CASES WITH NECROPSY.

JAMA. 1908;L(12):941-952. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310380013002c
Abstract

It is my purpose to deal with injuries of the spinal cord secondary to external violence, such as gunshot wounds, fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with involvement of the cord, and involvement of the cord in spinal concussion without spinal lesion. At this time I shall not discuss injuries of the cord from stab wounds.

There are a few points concerning the anatomy of the spinal column to which I wish to call attention before discussing any cases of fracture-dislocation. From our standpoint, the spinal column consists of twenty-four true vertebræ. The sacrum, which is morphologically five vertebræ, we consider in the light of a single bone. Of the coccyx I shall say very little, as it is interesting, chiefly, on account of a possibly faulty ankylosis in cases of fracture or contusion. The ligaments of the spinal column, next to the bony conformation of the vertebræ themselves, play the

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