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Article
March 21, 1908

THE FIRST CONVICTION UNDER THE FOOD AND DRUGS ACT.

JAMA. 1908;L(12):969. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.02530380041015
Abstract

The first conviction under the national Food and Drugs Act has been secured in Washington, the case being that of Robert N. Harper, manufacturer of a nostrum known as "Curforhedake," "Brane-Fude." An abstract of the case with a summary of the charge of the trial judge to the jury appears elsewhere.1 The practical common sense interpretation of the law by the judge in this instance is especially gratifying and commendable. He instructed the jury that the law was enacted for the protection of the ordinary average citizen and was to be interpreted with this point in view and that its meaning was not to be obscured by technicalities or expert decisions. This tendency to interpret the law in accordance with the language and phraseology used by those for whose protection the law was enacted should be followed by other courts before whom violations of pure food laws, both state

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