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Article
March 28, 1908

A SOURCE OF INJURY FROM ILLUMINATING GAS.

JAMA. 1908;L(13):1040. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.02530390038006
Abstract

The two chief products of combustion of coal and illuminating gas, carbon dioxid and water, being the same as the chief products of combustion in the animal body, are not appreciably injurious provided they are sufficiently diluted and removed with reasonable rapidity. The presence of sulphur in these sources of heat and light, however, leads to the formation of no inconsiderable amount of sulphuric and sulphurous acid, which may well be a source of considerable impairment of health. Every one who has the misfortune to live in a large city with a well-developed smoke nuisance is familiar with the extremely irritating quality of the air when, on moist days, the gases from the chimneys sink near the surface of the ground.

The Lancet in a recent editorial1 has called attention to an interesting bit of experimental evidence of the presence of sulphuric acid in the products of combustion of

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