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Article
May 23, 1908

SPINAL SPRAIN.ITS COMPLICATIONS AND CONSEQUENCES, WITH REPORT OF CASES.

JAMA. 1908;L(21):1679-1682. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310470017001f
Abstract

The object of this paper is to review from a practical and clinical standpoint the general subject of sprain of the spinal column, and to call attention to the value and frequent necessity of fixation of the spine. I will divide the cases into three clinical groups: (1) Sprain; (2) sprain followed by neurotic symptoms, and (3) sprain accompanied by spinal cord symptoms. Excluded entirely from the list are sacroiliac conditions, so often due to injury, Kummell's spondylitis, the ordinary neurasthenic spine which may originate in a slight trauma, spondylolisthesis, and cases of mild traumatic lumbago which promptly recover when treated by rest, heat and poultices.

CAUSE.  The injury that originates a true sprain of the spine is more often indirect than direct. In 17 of my 26 cases the cause was a fall on the buttocks, a fall on the feet, prolonged lifting, or a violent wrench of the

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