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Article
June 20, 1908

TONSILLECTOMY IN CHILDREN UNDER GENERAL ANESTHESIA—A HOSPITAL OPERATION.

JAMA. 1908;L(25):2049-2057. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310510017002a
Abstract

In early life the faucial tonsils are detrimental chiefly when, owing to their size, they serve as an obstruction to respiration. Tonsillotomy as ordinarily done generally corrects this feature of obstruction.

Previous to the past decade but little attention was paid to the faucial tonsils, particularly in young children, except when they protruded beyond the pillars. Latterly it has become recognized that non-protruding or submerged tonsils, even in young children, may be the cause of much trouble.

The protruding tonsil may also be of such size that a material portion thereof lies beneath the plane of the faucial pillars. In such case it may be said to be semi-submerged. Where this occurs, ordinary tonsillotomy becomes only a decapitation and thus the remaining base constitutes a submerged tonsil.

Submerged tonsils often have a considerable size, which becomes manifest when the patient is made to gag, at which time they bulge out

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