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September 26, 1908

INFANT MORTALITY.CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS BEFORE THE SECTION ON DISEASES OF CHILDREN, AT THE FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION, AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, 1908.

JAMA. 1908;LI(13):1045-1050. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25410130001001

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Abstract

The modern tendency in medicine is to concentrate each individual's efforts within comparatively narrow limits; if possible, to add some new facts or theories to present knowledge. The sum total of all the additions and advances has revolutionized medical knowledge in the last twenty years. Countless intelligent and zealous physicians working along different lines and in special departments of medicine have made it difficult, if not impossible, for any one to keep fully abreast of the times in all branches of medical science.

Perhaps this tendency in modern medical study has led to the neglect of certain broad principles of hygiene, diet, fresh air, bathing and general methods of living; these, being every one's business, have become no one's business.

John Gardner, surgeon, London, wrote in 1838 an interesting pamphlet on "Why So Large a Number of Children Perish." He appreciated certain physiologic differences between a child and an adult,

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