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September 26, 1908

LARYNGECTOMY FOR CARCINOMA OF THE LARYNX.REPORT OF TWO CASES, SPECIMENS EXHIBITED.

JAMA. 1908;LI(13):1072-1073. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25410130028003
Abstract

Case 1.—Patient.  —E. L. L., age 72, a mechanic, was first examined by me Sept. 5, 1903. He had always had excellent health until he lost his voice from a cold during the previous spring. He had used tobacco constantly and alcohol occasionally. Nothing in the man's appearance indicated dissipation. The hoarseness had been persistent and occasionally a little blood came from his throat. There had been more or less constant pain in the left ear radiating from the throat.

Examination.  —A laryngoscopic examination showed a growth rather larger than a bean, in the anterior commissure of the vocal cords, apparently springing from the under surface of the left cord. There was considerable infiltration about the left cord. The surface of the tumor was irregular and nodular, very hard and light in color, and the left cord perfectly immobile. A saturated solution of iodid of potassium was prescribed and

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