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Article
October 31, 1908

MILK AND ITS RELATION TO INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

JAMA. 1908;LI(18):1491-1496. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25410180015001e
Abstract

That milk may play a part in the spread of certain diseases has, for many years, been appreciated. From our present knowledge the more important of these are typhoid fever, scarlet fever, diphtheria, and possibly tuberculosis.

TYPHOID FEVER.  Undoubtedly the relative importance of the various agencies by which typhoid fever is distributed varies with the locality and conditions. The various factors, water, milk, flies and contact, have different values in the city and in the town. They will naturally also vary in importance with the season, the latitude, and the local customs. Improved water supplies have eliminated water as a factor in many places, while regulation of the production, handling and sale of milk is doing the same for it in some communities. It would seem that water has been so apparent as a frequent carrier of the infection that other agents have not been looked for, or at least

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